Communication

Childhood is full of exciting new experiences which we, as parents and teachers relive, through the eyes and laughter of our children. However, sometimes we have to begin to let go of our children and encourage them, through our assurance, to make the first steps towards independence.

When prospective parents are given tours of the School by the children, they are struck by the children’s sense of ‘belonging’. Such a sense of community is of immense value to children and to families and it stems from our wish to understand and care for the whole child.

Our care does not start and stop at the School gate. School is an extension of family life and we aim to know, understand and care for our children’ families. As children grow from dependence towards increasing independence, we wish them to become responsible for themselves and others. Children relish such opportunities from the earliest age and we make every effort to acknowledge acts of kindness and care, whether it be holding open a door for a visitor or noticing an unhappy friend in the playground. We are committed to encouraging the development of each child as a whole person. To this end each child has a Form Teacher or Form Tutor who oversees your child’s social, emotional, physical and academic development.

Our approach to education is founded on the co-operation between home and School and with each child’s overall interests at the core of what we do, be this with regard to specific aspects of a child’s learning, more general academic or pastoral matters within School or family and other circumstances beyond School which will inevitably have an effect on a child’s happiness and development. We aim to know, to understand and to support each child as an individual and communication is therefore an essential part of our work within School and with parents.

The simple principle for parents is to let us know of any concerns and to share with us any joys, in the certainty that we shall wish to celebrate the latter and address the former. It is this principle which underpins both our informal contact with you and the more formal, annual pattern of communication in reporting to parents.

This same principle informs our internal arrangements for the monitoring and care of each child. Form Teachers and Form Tutors should be the first point of contact for parents regarding your child’s welfare and happiness through the school day. Persistent or more worrying issues can be referred by them or indeed yourself to the Heads of Year/ Department and then to the Deputy Headmaster. The Headmaster is always available to discuss a child’s welfare.

Any significant pastoral or academic concern which arises at School will be shared with parents and the School wishes to know as soon as possible of any concern arising at home, whether or not it relates directly to School life.

If you are uncertain about anything at all, do please get in touch.